Accession Number : ADA601895


Title :   CVN's, is Eleven Too Many or Too Few?


Descriptive Note : Master's theses


Corporate Author : MARINE CORPS COMMAND AND STAFF COLL QUANTICO VA


Personal Author(s) : Thomas, Robert B


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a601895.pdf


Report Date : 10 Mar 2011


Pagination or Media Count : 31


Abstract : With respect to key regional areas, crew and equipment rotations, potential enemy threats, and the security of sea communication lines around the globe, the current quantity of CVNs in the U.S. Navy inventory is too few in number. The need to globally transport whole aircraft and provide aerial scouting platforms during naval operations after World War I paved the way to the design of the aircraft carrier. The novel concept of ships capable of launching and receiving wooden and canvas duel-winged airframes transformed in less than a century into massive capital ships that global freedom of the seas depend on for the secure passage of shipping lanes. This research paper will explore the transition of the aircraft carrier from a tactical platform to the strategic use we know today that serves not only national security policy but also maintains the free use of world sea communication lanes. Defense Secretary Gates recently called into question U.S. defense policy regarding the number, size, and mission of the U.S. Navy's nuclear aircraft carrier (CVN) fleet. This paper seeks to explore Defense Secretary Gates' question by examining the scope and purpose of the carrier fleet of the United Sates relative to the changing strategic and economic climates within which CVNs exist. U.S. Strategic Security Policy must present a strong show of force, or enemies will test the fortitude of America at every opportunity. Projection of force must be obvious and meaningful; the super aircraft carriers of the U.S. Navy serve just that role and purpose. The current fleet of 11 aircraft carriers is too few to handle the adequate projection of power and to sustain crew and equipment rest and refitting schedules. Twelve aircraft carriers is the number of ships needed to meet U.S. policymakers' requirements.


Descriptors :   *AIRCRAFT CARRIERS , *FLEETS(SHIPS) , *INVENTORY , *NAVY , *NUCLEAR POWERED SHIPS , *POLICIES , CARRIER BASED AIRCRAFT , THESES


Subject Categories : Marine Engineering
      Military Forces and Organizations


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE