Accession Number : ADA601871


Title :   Political Influence on Japanese Nuclear and Security Policy: New Forces Face Large Obstacles


Corporate Author : NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA CENTER ON CONTEMPORARY CONFLICT


Personal Author(s) : Tatsumi, Yuki ; Weiner, Robert


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a601871.pdf


Report Date : Feb 2014


Pagination or Media Count : 68


Abstract : Japan s nuclear weapons policy has long enjoyed a stable, if somewhat internally inconsistent, equilibrium. Anti-proliferation efforts co-exist with reliance upon the United States nuclear deterrent, alongside dependence on a nuclear energy program robust enough to potentially support nuclear weapons capability. These policies have been promoted and maintained by Japan s bureaucracy rather than by political bargains, with their bureaucratic proponents separately stovepiped rather than organized into a coherent whole. But new developments appear to leave Japan s nuclear security policy and its relations with the U.S. over this policy in flux. New threats and changing public attitudes are gradually eroding taboos on nuclear weapons. New or newly energized political actors stand to amplify the impact of such public opinion shifts. A more actively nuclear Japan could destabilize the U.S.-Japan alliance, raise nuclear weapons levels in Asia, and undercut Japan s role as a model nonnuclear ally; on the other hand, new anti-nuclear sentiment could hinder ongoing U.S.- Japan nuclear dialogue. This report first assesses the bureaucratically led status quo of Japanese nuclear policy and how its stakeholders have evolved. It then turns to an examination of newly emerging political influences on security policy, including nuclear policy the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) governments of 2009-2012, the new Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) administration led by Prime Minister Abe, apparently rising tides of nationalism, and the anti-nuclear-power movement. Though concerns about increased politicization are certainly justified, we find that these actors are less willing or able than they appear to dislodge Japan from its non-nuclear status quo.


Descriptors :   *GOVERNMENT(FOREIGN) , *JAPAN , *NUCLEAR WEAPONS , MASS DESTRUCTION WEAPONS , POLICIES , POLITICAL PARTIES , SECURITY


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Nuclear Weapons


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE