Accession Number : ADA601540


Title :   The Northern Ireland Framework for Peace: Terrorism and its Aftermath


Descriptive Note : Master's thesis


Corporate Author : MARINE CORPS COMMAND AND STAFF COLL QUANTICO VA


Personal Author(s) : Urry, Simon R


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a601540.pdf


Report Date : 10 Apr 2012


Pagination or Media Count : 77


Abstract : The focus of this paper is on assessing the stability and security of the framework for peace in Northern Ireland, lessons that have been learnt through its evolution, and recommendations for the future. As shall be seen, the Northern Ireland framework for peace today is not stable and secure for the future. The complexity of the problem begins with the number of actors involved: the nationalist and unionist people, the British and Irish governments and the military, including the Republican and Loyalist paramilitaries and the mix of Security Forces. The most difficult challenge for the peace process has been to manage the complex and non-linear interplay of these actors. The mutually exclusive Republican and Loyalist nationalisms remain unresolved, co-existing in tension. The 1998 Belfast Agreement established a framework for channeling these conflicting interests, but does not guarantee success. There are violent and non-violent forces that threaten the integrity of the framework for peace. These include Republican efforts to de-stabilize the process, the division of the unionist movement, the divisive effects of historical enquiries, the difficulties in reforming the police service and the criminal justice system, and implementing demilitarization. Dissident Republican threats to security and poor economic performance are the most significant forces today. There has been a persistent rise in dissident Republican terrorism since 2007. The dissidents are determined to remain relevant to the nationalist community. Their use of criminal enterprises and terrorist activity has brought a rise in Republican violence, a potent combination of political significance. The Northern Ireland economy has grown more slowly than any other part of the United Kingdom and depends heavily on dwindling public expenditure and grants. Northern Ireland must provide greater economic self-reliance and development with sustainable growth and prosperity.


Descriptors :   *MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN) , *PARAMILITARY FORCES , *PEACEKEEPING , *TERRORISM , *UNITED KINGDOM , COUNTERINSURGENCY , COUNTERTERRORISM , INSURGENCY , POLITICAL PARTIES


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE