Accession Number : ADA599368


Title :   Hemp as an Agricultural Commodity


Descriptive Note : Congressional rept.


Corporate Author : LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE


Personal Author(s) : Johnson, Renee


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a599368.pdf


Report Date : 14 Feb 2014


Pagination or Media Count : 34


Abstract : Industrial hemp is a variety of Cannabis sativa and is of the same plant species as marijuana. However, hemp is genetically different and distinguished by its use and chemical makeup. Hemp has long been cultivated for non-drug use in the production of industrial and other goods. Some estimate that the global market for hemp consists of more than 25,000 products. It can be grown as a fiber, seed, or other dual-purpose crop. Hemp fibers are used in a wide range of products, including fabrics and textiles, yarns and raw or processed spun fibers, paper, carpeting, home furnishings, construction and insulation materials, auto parts, and composites. The interior stalk (hurd) is used in various applications such as animal bedding, raw material inputs, low-quality papers, and composites. Hemp seed and oilcake are used in a range of foods and beverages, and can be an alternative food protein source. Oil from the crushed hemp seed is an ingredient in a range of body-care products and also nutritional supplements. Hemp seed is also used for industrial oils, cosmetics and personal care, and pharmaceuticals, among other composites. Precise data are not available on the size of the U.S. market for hemp-based products. Current industry estimates report that U.S. retail sales of all hemp-based products may be nearly $500 million per year. Because there is no commercial industrial hemp production in the United States, the U.S. market is largely dependent on imports, both as finished hemp-containing products and as ingredients for use in further processing. Under the current U.S. drug policy, all cannabis varieties, including hemp, are considered Schedule I controlled substances under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA, 21 U.S.C. 801 et seq.; Title 21 CFR Part 1308.11). As such, while there are legitimate industrial uses, these are controlled and regulated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Strictly speaking, the CSA does not make growing hemp illegal; rather, it pl


Descriptors :   *CANNABIS , *LEGISLATION , *PLANTS(BOTANY) , *PRODUCTION , AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS , COMMODITIES , CONTROL , DRUGS , IMPORTS , NUTRITION , OILS , STATE LAW , TOILET ARTICLES


Subject Categories : Agronomy, Horticulture and Aquiculture
      Government and Political Science
      Agricultural Economics
      Pharmacology


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE