Accession Number : ADA591362


Title :   Shoreline Change Modeling Using One- Line Models: General Model Comparison and Literature Review


Descriptive Note : Technical note


Corporate Author : ENGINEER RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER VICKSBURG MS COASTAL AND HYDRAULICS LAB


Personal Author(s) : Thomas, Robert C ; Frey, Ashley E


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a591362.pdf


Report Date : Dec 2013


Pagination or Media Count : 10


Abstract : The purpose of this Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) is to document the differences and similarities in the most popular and available shoreline change models employing the one-line approach. One-line shoreline change models calculate evolution of shoreline position by assuming that the beach profile shape remains constant as it advances or retreats and the shoreline evolves to conserve sand along adjacent beaches. Engineers and scientists have analyzed long term shoreline evolution primarily using (1) measurement and analysis of historical shoreline position, (2) models based on the conservation of sand volume equation (one-line models), (3) coastal morphodynamics models, and (4) physical models (Dean and Dalrymple 2002). Statistical analysis of data (method 1) is the most accurate method to characterize shoreline change, but it does not provide a means to evaluate potential changes to the system as a function of engineering activities (e.g., construction of a breakwater, beach nourishment) or major climate change. Numerical models of the equations of motion, the coastal morphodynamics models (method 3), in simple or more complete forms, require large computational resources and are not well suited to the large spatial and temporal scales over which beaches evolve. Physical models (method 4) are well suited to local analysis but are cost prohibitive to use for very large scales; model-to-field scaling also becomes an issue when attempting to evaluate large areas with a small model. Therefore, the conservation-of-sand-volume approach (method 2), also known as the one-line approach, has remained the preferred model for evaluating shoreline change that could result from anthropogenic or natural changes in the beach system. The one-line concept is based on the premise that the beach profile shape remains constant as it advances or retreats so that volume change is directly related to shoreline change (Frey et al. 2012).


Descriptors :   *COASTAL REGIONS , *SEDIMENT TRANSPORT , *TERRAIN MODELS , BEACHES , COMPARISON , EQUATIONS , INLETS(WATERWAYS) , INTERNAL WAVES , KINETICS , LITERATURE SURVEYS , LITTORAL ZONES , SAND


Subject Categories : Geography
      Hydrology, Limnology and Potamology


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE