Accession Number : ADA586375


Title :   Deployment and Post-Deployment Experiences in OEF/OIF Veterans: Relationship to Gray Matter Volume


Descriptive Note : Journal article


Corporate Author : CALIFORNIA UNIV SAN FRANCISCO DEPT OF PSYCHIATRY


Personal Author(s) : Aupperle, Robin L ; Connolly, Colm G ; Stillman, Ashley N ; May, April C ; Paulus, Martin P


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a586375.pdf


Report Date : 18 Sep 2013


Pagination or Media Count : 10


Abstract : Combat-related PTSD has been associated with reduced gray matter volume in regions of the prefrontal and temporal cortex, hippocampus, insula, and amygdala. However, the relationship between gray matter volume and specific deployment and post-deployment experiences has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to delineate how such experiences may contribute to structural brain changes for combat veterans. Combat-related PTSD has been associated with reduced gray matter volume in regions of the prefrontal and temporal cortex, hippocampus, insula, and amygdala. However, the relationship between gray matter volume and specific deployment and post-deployment experiences has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to delineate how such experiences may contribute to structural brain changes for combat veterans. There was an interaction between severity of combat experiences and military social support for orbitofrontal gyrus gray matter volume. Specifically, individuals with more orbitofrontal gyrus gray matter volume reported less combat experiences and higher unit support. Individuals with more severe PTSD symptoms showed reduced gray matter volume within a large temporal region (inferior temporal and parahippocampal gyrus). The identified association between unit support and orbitofrontal gyrus volume supports two potential resilience mechanisms to be delineated with future longitudinal studies. First, individuals with larger orbitofrontal gyrus may engage in greater quality of social interactions and thus experience combat as less stressful. Second, individuals who experience greater unit support may preserve a larger orbitofrontal gyrus, serving to protect them from aversive consequences of combat.


Descriptors :   *TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURIES , AFGHANISTAN CONFLICT , BEHAVIOR , BRAIN , DEPLOYMENT , IRAQI WAR , MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING , REGRESSION ANALYSIS , VETERANS(MILITARY PERSONNEL)


Subject Categories : Medicine and Medical Research


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE