Accession Number : ADA577844


Title :   Getting Ugly: Exploring Network Development in The Ugly American


Descriptive Note : Master's thesis


Corporate Author : NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA DEFENSE ANALYSIS DEPT


Personal Author(s) : Teta, Richard P


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a577844.pdf


Report Date : Dec 2012


Pagination or Media Count : 129


Abstract : While social network analysis (SNA) has been utilized for a wide variety of purposes across various academic, business, and consulting fields, military applications of this emerging field have tended to focus on the mapping of dark networks. By borrowing from the considerable accumulation of SNA software and network theory, this work reveals how techniques designed for network analysis and dark network interdiction can also help reveal distinct characteristics of successful approaches to host nation interaction and indigenous network development. The network models examined in this thesis are drawn from William J. Lederer and Eugene Burdick's book, The Ugly American. This text, widely viewed as an indictment of the application of U.S. foreign policy in Asia throughout the mid-20th century, serves as a foundation for the examination of indigenous network development at both the operational and tactical levels. The goal of this thesis is to illuminate and elucidate the unique characteristics of four network design approaches that appear in the book. This study also seeks to re-emphasize the important and often overlooked principles of effective host nation interaction presented in The Ugly American that have been recognized and discussed by generations of Foreign Service officers, military advisors, and civilian volunteers.


Descriptors :   *COMMUNISM , *FOREIGN POLICY , *GOVERNMENT(FOREIGN) , *INDIGENOUS POPULATION , *NETWORKS , *SOUTHEAST ASIA , *UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT , ASYMMETRIC WARFARE , DIPLOMATS , INTERACTIONS , INTERDICTION , INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS , OFFICER PERSONNEL , THESES


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Psychology


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE