Accession Number : ADA576048


Title :   Building the New Culture of Training


Descriptive Note : Journal article


Corporate Author : ARMY COMBINED ARMS CENTER FORT LEAVENWORTH KS MILITARY REVIEW


Personal Author(s) : Cone, Robert W


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a576048.pdf


Report Date : Feb 2013


Pagination or Media Count : 7


Abstract : Our Army is approaching a crossroads. Even as we continue examining wartime lessons, transitioning to an Army of preparation, and realizing the digital revolution s potential, we are confronting a number of crucial decisions. Among them is defining our approach to reinvigorating how the Army trains and readies for future conflicts. What we already know is that any future progress rests upon inspiring this young generation of soldiers. There is little chance such inspiration can be found in a haphazard approach. Rather, we must take a slight pause in our tempo to engage in serious reflection and assess the future of training. Ultimately, three imperatives emerge as the foundation for training the Army of 2020: -Return ownership of training to commanders and hold them responsible for engaging our young leaders. -Refine and improve our understanding of the human elements of warfare. -Harness the promise of technology to allow us to train faster, better, and more efficiently. Reviewing the lessons learned following our last transition from a major war is helping to craft these imperatives into a coherent narrative. Our Army has been through this before. The Army that left Vietnam faced many of the challenges we confront today. At that time, General William DePuy and the newly formed U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command stepped forward to lead an intense, introspective review of how our Army trained and educated itself. TRADOC s efforts were controversial and took years to implement. However, the reward for this perseverance was a set of four innovations that changed our Army forever: standards-based training, the Noncommissioned Officer Education System, operational concepts, and the Big 5 the Abrams, Bradley, Paladin, Apache, and Blackhawk.


Descriptors :   *ARMY TRAINING , LEADERSHIP , LESSONS LEARNED , MILITARY COMMANDERS , MILITARY HISTORY , OPERATIONAL READINESS


Subject Categories : Military Forces and Organizations


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE