Accession Number : ADA569175


Title :   Thermotolerance and Human Performance: Role of Heat Shock Proteins


Descriptive Note : Conference paper


Corporate Author : OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF THE ARMY (ACQUISITION LOGISTICS AND TECHNOLOGY) WASHINGTON DC


Personal Author(s) : Carter, Robert ; Calais, Charles J


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a569175.pdf


Report Date : Oct 2009


Pagination or Media Count : 9


Abstract : Introduction: Thermotolerance (intrinsic and acquired) is the ability of the body and its cellular structures to withstand severe destructive heat stress. Acquired thermotolerance [adaptive] (ATT) is induced by pre-exposure to elevated but non-lethal temperatures and leads to enhanced cellular protection, synthesis of stress and heat shock proteins (HSPs), and reduced risk from subsequent heat injury. Enhanced intrinsic [native] thermotolerance (ITT), which has been described in several non-human organisms (i.e., nematodes, yeast), has been demonstrated when these organisms are subjected to pre-lethal exposure during a variety of developmental stages. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the molecular mechanisms and signalling pathways for ITT and ATT may be different. Rationale: Given that novel interventions which may lead to enhanced ITT could play a role in human physical performance and adaptability to known lethal environments (i.e., radioactive, excessive heat), characterization of these biological pathways are warranted. The role and signalling pathways of ITT are relatively unknown in humans. Moreover, whether or not subsets of the populations (i.e., East African runners) have greater native or induced thermotolerance remains controversial. It is likely that individual thermoregulatory responses to exercise heat stress are due the combination of ITT and ATT; however, the focus of most studies has been on ATT. Methods: The question remains can science and technology be exploited to make man more resistant to environmental stressors? Human's resistance to environmental heat stress by increased ITT could be achieved by either genetic or environmental manipulation during early development. However, the possibilities of such robust molecular manipulations could not be achieved with significant ethical considerations. Conclusions: By exploring the molecular mechanisms of ITT in humans, we could begin to understand how to tolerate higher body temperatures.


Descriptors :   *HEAT TOLERANCE , ADAPTATION(PHYSIOLOGY) , HEAT STRESS(PHYSIOLOGY) , PERFORMANCE(HUMAN) , PROTEINS


Subject Categories : Biochemistry
      Stress Physiology


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE