Accession Number : ADA558657


Title :   The Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Motivation for Health Improvement on Anthropometric Measurements in High Risk Individuals


Descriptive Note : Master's thesis


Corporate Author : AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT


Personal Author(s) : Kirchner, Aimee T


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a558657.pdf


Report Date : 22 Mar 2012


Pagination or Media Count : 131


Abstract : Unhealthy lifestyles cost businesses, governmental organizations, and the United States military billions of dollars every year. To fight this rising cost as well as potentially save lives this study sought to understand if a cognitive-behavioral motivation treatment could positively affect the cognitive variables (attitude, self-efficacy, and locus of control) that induce long term behavior change. Anthropometric measurements, specifically body mass index, abdominal circumference, and abdominal height, were used to determine if long term behavior change resulted from the treatment. The Theory of Planned Behavior was the basis of this thesis? model, while the Valence, Instrumentality, and Expectancy (VIE) theory was the foundation for the cognitive-behavioral motivation treatment. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) tested the theory based model and found two results: a cognitive-behavioral motivation treatment can positively affect cognitive changes that improve behavior and health and, a causal or mediation relationship among the cognitive variables of locus of control and self-efficacy was found instead of the predicted parallel relationship. Effective implementation of an intervention like the one used in this study could lower the United States Air Force?s health care bill by as much as $40 million, improve employee efficiency and mission capability, enable longer healthier lives, and prevent premature death.


Descriptors :   *ANTHROPOMETRY , *BEHAVIOR , *COGNITION , ABDOMEN , HEALTH , MEDICAL SERVICES , MILITARY PERSONNEL , MOTIVATION , UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT


Subject Categories : Psychology
      Anatomy and Physiology
      Medicine and Medical Research


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE