Accession Number : ADA558144


Title :   Operational Energy Strategy: Implementation Plan


Corporate Author : OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE WASHINGTON DC (OPERATIONAL ENERGY PLANS AND PROGRAMS)


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a558144.pdf


Report Date : Mar 2012


Pagination or Media Count : 29


Abstract : Pursuant to title 10, U.S.C., section 138c, the Department of Defense (DoD) published the Operational Energy Strategy on June 14, 2011, to transform the way U.S. Armed Forces consume energy in military operations. The Strategy sets the direction for operational energy use within the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) and the Joint Staff, Combatant Commands, Military Departments, and Defense agencies (hereinafter referred to collectively as the DoD Components ). The goal of the Operational Energy Strategy is energy security for the Warfighter to assure that U.S. forces have a reliable supply of energy for 21st century military missions. For DoD to reach this goal, the Strategy provides a three-fold approach: More Fight, Less Fuel: Reduce Demand for Energy in Military Operations. Today s military missions require large and growing amounts of energy with supply lines that can be costly, vulnerable to disruption, and a burden on Warfighters. The Department needs to improve its ability to measure operational energy consumption, reduce demand, and increase the efficiency of energy use to enhance combat effectiveness. More Options, Less Risk: Expand and Secure Energy Supplies for Military Operations. Reliance on a single energy source petroleum has economic, strategic, and environmental drawbacks. In addition, the security of energy supply infrastructure for critical missions at fixed installations is not always robust. The Department needs to diversify its energy sources and protect access to energy supplies to have a more assured supply of energy for military missions. More Capability, Less Cost: Build Energy Security into the Future Force. While the force s energy requirements entail tactical, operational, and strategic risks, the Department s institutions and processes for building future military forces do not systematically consider such risks and costs.


Descriptors :   *ENERGY CONSUMPTION , COMBAT EFFECTIVENESS , COSTS , DEFENSE SYSTEMS , ENVIRONMENTS , FUELS , INFRASTRUCTURE , INSTALLATION , MILITARY OPERATIONS , PETROLEUM PRODUCTS , STRATEGY


Subject Categories : Non-electrical Energy Conversion


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE