Accession Number : ADA553813


Title :   A Psychophysiologic Study of Weakening Traumatic Combat Memories with Post-Reactivation Propranolol


Descriptive Note : Final rept. 1 Jun 2007-31 May 2011


Corporate Author : MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL BOSTON


Personal Author(s) : Pitman, Roger K


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a553813.pdf


Report Date : Jun 2011


Pagination or Media Count : 16


Abstract : Introduction: The eta-adrenergic blocker propranolol has been shown to reduce reconsolidation of aversive memories in rodents. Administration of propranolol following reactivation of traumatic memories in male and female civilians with PTSD has been shown to reduce physiological responses during subsequent mental imagery the traumatic event. Aims: The present study aimed to examine whether the fear-weakening effect of propranolol may be due to non-specific actions of the drug. Here we investigated the effect of propranolol given with or without the reactivation otraumatic combat memories. Methods: Twenty-three male subjects with combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder received propranolol wit(n=12) or without (n=11) experimentally induced, concomitant traumatic memory retrieval (reactivation), randomized and double-blind. A week later, they engaged in script-driven mental imagery of their traumatic combevent while physiological responses were recorded. Results: The physiological responses during script-driven imagery of both the reactivation propranolol group and the non-reactivation propranolol group were below the normative cutoffs for PTSD. There were no significant between-group differences in physiological responses or in change in self-reported PTSD symptoms. Discussion: The lack of significant group differences fails to support the proposition that the putative fear-weakening effect of propranolol is mediated by a reconsolidation mechanism.


Descriptors :   *POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER , *STRESS(PSYCHOLOGY) , ACTIVATION , CARDIOVASCULAR AGENTS , DRUGS , FEMALES , INFORMATION RETRIEVAL , MEMORY DEVICES , MEMORY(PSYCHOLOGY) , MENTAL ABILITY , ORDER DISORDER TRANSFORMATIONS , PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS , PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY , RANDOM VARIABLES , RESPONSE(BIOLOGY) , WARFARE


Subject Categories : Psychology
      Anatomy and Physiology
      Medicine and Medical Research
      Stress Physiology


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE