Accession Number : ADA545719


Title :   Gone to Fiddler's Green: Reconnaissance and Security for the Corps


Descriptive Note : Monograph Jun 2010-May 2011


Corporate Author : ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES


Personal Author(s) : Goings, Brian C


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a545719.pdf


Report Date : May 2011


Pagination or Media Count : 65


Abstract : This study addresses a corps requirement for reconnaissance and security through the criteria of doctrine, capability and organization. The study uses the criteria to describe how Army doctrine shapes a corps requirement for a reconnaissance and security organization, the capabilities such an organization requires, and the actual organizational structure of the reconnaissance and security force the Army designed. The case studies for analysis are the II Field Force, Vietnam and 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment in Operation TOAN THANG 43; VII Corps and 2d Armored Cavalry Regiment in Operation DESERT STORM; and V Corps in Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. The first two case studies represent different eras in the U.S. Army's history which saw corps-sized formations employ a dedicated reconnaissance and security organization. These case studies establish the Army's previous experience with armored cavalry regiments against different enemies and on different types of terrain. The last case study, Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, addresses a corps operating without a dedicated reconnaissance and security organization. The set of criteria to analyze the case studies are doctrine, capability, and organization. The main findings indicated the need for corps to have a dedicated reconnaissance and security organization. Although transformation in its final stages, the Army is still in a period of transition between the Army of Excellence and Modularity in terms of doctrine, organization, material, and leadership. The U.S. Army?s experience in Cambodia in 1970 and Kuwait in 1991 demonstrated the importance a corps reconnaissance and security organization had during the execution of division and corps attacks. Regardless of the terrain or weather conditions, the armored cavalry regiments supporting division and corps-sized organizations, respectively, were able to locate the enemy and deve


Descriptors :   *MILITARY CAPABILITIES , *MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS , *RECONNAISSANCE , *MILITARY DOCTRINE , REGIMENT LEVEL ORGANIZATIONS , VIETNAM , SECURITY , ARMORED VEHICLES , IRAQ , MILITARY OPERATIONS


Subject Categories : Military Forces and Organizations
      Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE