Accession Number : ADA545443


Title :   Resolving Insurgencies


Descriptive Note : Monograph


Corporate Author : ARMY WAR COLL STRATEGIC STUDIES INST CARLISLE BARRACKS PA


Personal Author(s) : Mockaitis, Thomas R


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a545443.pdf


Report Date : Jun 2011


Pagination or Media Count : 108


Abstract : The study of counterinsuregency (COIN) has focused disproportionately on its operational and tactical aspects at the expense of larger strategic considerations. Foremost among these neglected considerations is the vexing problem of how insurgencies actually end. Most studies presume that insurgencies, like conventional wars, conclude with a clear-cut victory by one side or the other. Preoccupation with the anti-colonial insurgencies following World War II has reinforced this thinking. However, consideration of a broader selection of conflicts reveals that most did not end in such a clear, decisive manner. This monograph examines 12 insurgencies clustered in four groups based upon how they ended: conflicts in which the insurgents won; conflicts in which the government won; insurgencies that degenerated into mere terrorism or criminality; and insurgencies resolved by co-opting the insurgents into legitimate politics through a negotiated settlement and reintegrating them into normal social life. The author argues that Group 4 insurgencies provide the best examples from which to derive lessons relevant to the United States acting in support of a state threatened with insurgency. From these lessons, a political strategy of co-option can be developed - a strategy combing diplomatic, informational, military, economic, financial, intelligence, and law enforcement assets in a unified effort. However, such a strategy can only work when there is sufficient political will to sustain the protracted effort necessary for it to succeed. The monograph concludes with consideration of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.


Descriptors :   *COUNTERINSURGENCY , *STRATEGIC ANALYSIS , AFGHANISTAN CONFLICT , IRAQI WAR , POLITICAL NEGOTIATIONS , LESSONS LEARNED , MILITARY HISTORY


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Unconventional Warfare


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE