Accession Number : ADA543665


Title :   Veterans Affairs: Presumptive Service Connection and Disability Compensation


Descriptive Note : Congressional rept.


Corporate Author : LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE


Personal Author(s) : Panangala, Sidath V ; Scott, Christine ; Weimer, Douglas R ; Moulta-Ali, Umar


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a543665.pdf


Report Date : 28 Mar 2011


Pagination or Media Count : 34


Abstract : The United States has provided benefits in varying degrees to those who have worn the uniform and suffered disabilities in service to the nation. In general, a veteran is entitled to compensation for disabilities incurred in or aggravated during active military, naval, or air service. It should be noted that not all persons who served in the military are considered veterans for purposes of veterans benefits. Veterans could meet the burden of proving that their disabilities are service connected through their military records, which may clearly describe and document the circumstances and medical treatment for an injury or an illness incurred while in service as well as any resulting disability. However, where the manifestation of the disability is remote from the veteran's service and any relationship between the disability and service is not readily apparent, the burden of proving service connection can be a challenge. In such circumstances, Congress and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have relied on presumptions. In the context of VA claims adjudication, a presumption could be seen as a procedure to relieve veterans of the burden to prove that a disability or illness was caused by a specific exposure that occurred during service in the Armed Forces. When a disease is designated as presumptively service-connected, the individual veteran does not need to prove that the disease was incurred during service. The legislative history of veterans? disease presumptions dates back to 1921 when Congress established a presumption of service connection with an amendment (P.L. 67-47) to the War Risk Insurance Act (P.L. 63-193). It established presumptions of service connection for tuberculosis and neuropsychiatric disease (known today as psychosis) occurring within two years of separation from active duty military service. In the following years, additions to the presumptive list were made by regulation, executive order, and legislation.


Descriptors :   *COMPENSATION , *VETERANS(MILITARY PERSONNEL) , *PHYSICAL DISABILITIES , MEDICAL SERVICES , INCAPACITATION , BENEFITS , WOUNDS AND INJURIES , ACTIVE DUTY , MILITARY FORCES(UNITED STATES)


Subject Categories : Economics and Cost Analysis
      Personnel Management and Labor Relations
      Military Forces and Organizations


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE