Accession Number : ADA543260


Title :   Navy Ship Names: Background for Congress


Descriptive Note : Congressional rept.


Corporate Author : LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE


Personal Author(s) : O'Rourke, Ronald


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a543260.pdf


Report Date : 01 Apr 2011


Pagination or Media Count : 21


Abstract : Navy, under the direction of the President and in accordance with rules prescribed by Congress. Rules for giving certain types of names to certain types of Navy ships have evolved over time. There have been exceptions to the Navy's ship-naming rules, particularly for the purpose of naming a ship for a person when the rule for that type of ship would have called for it to be named for something else. Some observers in recent years have perceived a breakdown in, or corruption of, the rules for naming Navy ships. The 10 most recently named aircraft carriers have been named for U.S. presidents (8 ships) and Members of Congress (2 ships). Virginia (SSN-774) class attack submarines are being named for states. An exception occurred on January 8, 2009, when the Secretary of the Navy announced that SSN-785, the 12th ship in the class, would be named for former Senator John Warner. Destroyers are named for U.S. naval leaders and heroes. Littoral Combat Ships (LCSs) are being named for small and medium-sized cities. Exceptions to the class naming rule arguably have occurred with LCS-3, LCS-5, and LCS-7, which the Navy named for the relatively large cities of Fort Worth, TX; Milwaukee, WS; and Detroit, MI, respectively. San Antonio (LPD-17) class amphibious ships are being named for U.S. cities. An exception occurred on April 23, 2010, when the Secretary of the Navy announced that LPD-26, the 10th ship in the class, would be named for the late Representative John P. Murtha. The Navy announced on June 27, 2008, that the first LHA-6 class amphibious assault ship would be named America, a name previously used for an aircraft carrier (CV-66) that served in the Navy from 1965 to 1996. Lewis and Clark (TAKE-1) class cargo and ammunition ships are being named for noted explorers and pioneers of various kinds.


Descriptors :   *NAVAL VESSELS , DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE , LEGISLATION , AIRCRAFT CARRIERS , ATTACK SUBMARINES , CONGRESS


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Marine Engineering


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE