Accession Number : ADA539310


Title :   An Investigation of Loss of Control Eating Disorder in Children


Descriptive Note : Master's thesis


Corporate Author : UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIV OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES BETHESDA MD


Personal Author(s) : Elliott, Camden


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a539310.pdf


Report Date : 19 Feb 2010


Pagination or Media Count : 92


Abstract : Loss of control (LOC) over eating is reported during middle childhood samples. LOC eating is associated with overweight and disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. However, data suggest that children (6-12y) may have a different clustering of associated disordered eating attitudes and behaviors from those typically reported by adults and adolescents with binge eating. We therefore investigated a newly proposed diagnostic category based on young children's disordered eating presentation, Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED). The Eating Disorder Examination adapted for Children, the Standard Pediatric Eating Episode Interview, and questionnaires to assess psychopathology were administered to 256 non-treatment-seeking youth (age 10.3-1.5y 52.3% girls). Body fat (kg) was measured using air displacement plethysmography. Using the proposed criteria, we identified youth with LOC-ED (n=7), youth with LOC in the absence of the full disorder (subLOC=33), and youth not reporting the experience of LOC (noLOC=216). No child met criteria for DSM-defined binge eating disorder. After adjustment for age, sex and race, LOC-ED youth had more body fat compared to noLOC youth (p=.02), but not to those in the subLOC group (p=.10). SubLOC and noLOC youth did not differ from each other on measures of body fat. Considering the same covariates and BMI z-score, LOC-ED youth had greater Eating and Shape Concerns than subLOC and noLOC youth (psless than or equal 05). SubLOC youth also had greater Eating and Shape Concerns than noLOC youth (ps.001). Those with subLOC self-reported more symptoms of anxiety and depression than noLOC youth (ps less than or equal .02), but did not differ from LOC-ED youth. These data suggest that youth with LOC-ED have greater adiposity and disordered eating attitudes than youth not reporting the experience of LOC, as well as those with LOC in the absence of the full disorder.


Descriptors :   *MENTAL DISORDERS , *OBESITY , *ANXIETY , *CHILDREN , *METABOLIC DISEASES , *SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS , YOUTH , PLETHYSMOGRAPHY , ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY , SEX , ADULTS , ADOLESCENTS , ADIPOSE TISSUE


Subject Categories : Psychology
      Medicine and Medical Research


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE