Accession Number : ADA538495


Title :   Defining the Antigenic Structure of the Henipavirus Attachment (G) Glycoprotein: Implications for the Fusion Mechanism


Descriptive Note : Doctoral thesis


Corporate Author : UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIV OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES BETHESDA MD


Personal Author(s) : Hickey, Andrew C


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a538495.pdf


Report Date : Jan 2009


Pagination or Media Count : 204


Abstract : Epidemics of communicable disease such as the Medieval Black Death (Yersinia pestes) or the introduction of smallpox to the Aztecs decimated human populations interrupted trade routes, and transformed social and economic conventions (reviewed in 69, 105, 136). However, communicable diseases remained enigmatic until the advancement of germ theory suggested these illnesses resulted from discrete biological sources. In 1928, Sir Alexander Flemming discovered penicillin and proved communicable disease could be treated and cured (54). Further, development of the smallpox and rabies vaccines by Edward Jenner and Louis Pasteur, respectively demonstrated illness was preventable. These scientific advances ushered in an era of rapid development in prophylactic and therapeutic modalities resulting in significant global decreases in the health burden of infectious agents. As early as the mid 1940s widespread achievement in the control of infectious disease prompted public health leaders in the United States and elsewhere to declare the global threat of infectious disease had passed (140).


Descriptors :   *COMMUNICABLE DISEASES , GLYCOPROTEINS , THESES , INFECTIOUS DISEASES , VARIOLA VIRUS , ANTIGENS , EPIDEMIOLOGY , VACCINES , UNITED STATES , PUBLIC HEALTH


Subject Categories : Medicine and Medical Research


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE