Accession Number : ADA535293


Title :   Bush v. Bin Laden: Effect of State Emotion on Perceived Threat is Mediated by Emotion Towards the Threat Agent (Bush vs. Ben Laden: l'Effet de l'Emotion etat sur la Menace Percue est Mediatisees par l'Emotion vis-a-vis de l'Agent Menacant)


Descriptive Note : Journal article


Corporate Author : DEFENCE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT TORONTO (CANADA)


Personal Author(s) : Mandel, David R ; Vartanian, Oshin


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a535293.pdf


Report Date : Jul 2009


Pagination or Media Count : 22


Abstract : The authors conducted an experiment to examine the effect of specific (fear and anger) and global emotional states on perceptions of threat posed by either George W. Bush or Osama Bin Laden. Findings revealed a case of moderated mediation: For participants who evaluated Bush, negative state emotion directly predicted perceived threat and was fully mediated by negative emotion evoked by Bush. For participants who evaluated Bin Laden, however, negative state emotion did not predict perceived threat. The authors discuss implications of the findings for theories that postulate an effect of emotion on risk perceptions and for understanding threat perception in the terrorism context.


Descriptors :   *EMOTIONS , *TERRORISM , *PERCEPTION(PSYCHOLOGY) , *THREATS , RISK ANALYSIS , COUNTERTERRORISM , CANADA , VULNERABILITY , NATIONAL SECURITY , REPRINTS , ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE


Subject Categories : Psychology
      Unconventional Warfare


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE