Accession Number : ADA524538


Title :   Control Over the Nile: Implications across Nations


Descriptive Note : Master's thesis


Corporate Author : NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA DEFENSE ANALYSIS DEPT


Personal Author(s) : Chesire, David K


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a524538.pdf


Report Date : Jun 2010


Pagination or Media Count : 93


Abstract : Worldwide, shared water resources continue to attract attention owing to the nature of utilization, which often leads to either conflict or cooperation among and between countries. In analyzing the likelihood of actual interstate combat among the Nile basin countries, this thesis answers the following question: Under what conditions are water scarcity and contested water agreements likely to lead to interstate conflict? The nested questions are as follows: (1) What is the extent of water scarcity among the Nile basin countries?, (2) What is the legitimacy of the current Nile Water Agreements?, and (3) What are the implications of the current state of affairs for the upstream riparian countries and Egypt? Among the major findings of the study are as follows: agreements entered among Egypt, Sudan, and Britain during the colonial era have served as sources of conflict over the use of the Nile waters; and Egypt continues to monopolize utilization of the Nile waters despite increasing efforts by other riparian states to effect a cooperative framework for equitable use. Water scarcity in the region also results from overconsumption of Nile water by Egypt and Sudan, rising populations, and environmental changes. Further, the international community, notably the African Union and the United Nations, have not played significant roles in resolving water disputes in the Nile basin. Besides pursuing renegotiation of Nile water agreements, riparian states need to consider exploring alternative water sources, and Nile basin countries need to address their rising populations. In addition, the international community needs to take a more proactive role in resolving Nile water disputes.


Descriptors :   *CONTROL , *COMPETITION , *COOPERATION , *UTILIZATION , *WATER RESOURCES , *AFRICA , *RIVERS , *AGREEMENTS , CONSUMPTION , HEGEMONY , TANZANIA , UNITED KINGDOM , UNITED NATIONS , BURUNDI , RWANDA , BASINS(GEOGRAPHIC) , UGANDA , NEGOTIATIONS , ZAIRE , KENYA , ETHIOPIA , CONFLICT , SHARING , HYDROLOGY , THESES , DEMOGRAPHY , EGYPT , SUDAN


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Hydrology, Limnology and Potamology
      Water Pollution and Control


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE