Accession Number : ADA520319


Title :   On Major Naval Operations


Descriptive Note : Journal article


Corporate Author : NAVAL WAR COLL NEWPORT RI


Personal Author(s) : Vego, Milan


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a520319.pdf


Report Date : Jan 2007


Pagination or Media Count : 34


Abstract : Major naval operations are the principal methods of combat force employment by which operational or strategic objectives are accomplished in a conventional high-intensity war at sea. The U.S. Navy and other major Western navies planned and executed a large number of major naval operations in World War II as part of maritime and, in several cases, land campaigns. However, such major operations have been conducted on few occasions since 1945. The main reason for that is that none of the numerous regional conflicts fought in the past sixty years have involved large navies on both sides. The U.S. Navy and other major navies are currently involved in operations short of war, such as peacekeeping and peace enforcement, maritime interception operations (MIO), and protection of friendly shipping against various hostile acts on the high seas, such as piracy or transnational terrorism. Among other things, they are also employed in preventing illegal immigration and drug smuggling. In some cases, employment of one's naval forces, such as support or counterinsurgency (COIN) or MIO, might be aimed at achieving operational objectives. However, such actions lack many attributes of conventional major naval or joint operations. The focus here is exclusively on those planned and conducted in a conventional high-intensity conflict.


Descriptors :   *NAVAL OPERATIONS , CONVENTIONAL WARFARE , PEACEKEEPING , COUNTERINSURGENCY , REPRINTS


Subject Categories : Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE