Accession Number : ADA517022


Title :   Logistical Art


Descriptive Note : Journal article


Corporate Author : ARMY CENTER OF MILITARY HISTORY WASHINGTON DC


Personal Author(s) : Newell, Clayton R


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a517022.pdf


Report Date : Mar 1989


Pagination or Media Count : 10


Abstract : The United States has fought its recent wars by dominating its enemies with overwhelming logistical support. In today's resource-constrained environment, however, the shoe may be on the other foot. In Western Europe, for example, the Soviets and the Warsaw Pact may well have the advantage in bringing brute force logistics to bear. The success of American military strategy in Europe, or anywhere else in the world, may depend on how well the U.S. Army's logistics philosophy adapts to new realities. The Army can no longer afford a logistics philosophy which allows its commanders to assume an endless supply of everything. As war becomes more dependent on science and technology, commanders tend to rely more heavily on their logisticians to keep the machinery of war operating. The science of logistics is not new to warfare, but it came to its ultimate fruition during World War II. Between the World Wars both tanks and trucks were introduced into armies on a mass scale, During World War II at the tactical and operational levels, the truck became to logistics what the tank became to battle. The tank-truck team revolutionized warfare and logistics, and as logistics became more technical it tended to become regarded more as a science and less as an art. But the art of logistics was not lost on all military planners. There were those commanders who successfully combined logistical and operational art in World War II. By 1944 Allied logistics planning reached its zenith with Operation Overlord, the campaign that began with the Allies' invasion of France and ended with their armies in the very heart of Germany. Logisticians labored for years preparing meticulous plans to support that effort. Yet in the end, it was not so much the logistics planning that measured the success of the Allied invasion of Europe, but the initiative and imagination of commanders in ignoring, adapting, and improvising logistics plans and systems as the campaign progressed: logistical art.


Descriptors :   *ARMY , *SECOND WORLD WAR , *MILITARY ART , *TANKS(COMBAT VEHICLES) , *LOGISTICS PLANNING , *TRUCKS , *LOGISTICS SUPPORT , STRATEGIC WARFARE , SUPPLIES , VIETNAM WAR , MILITARY COMMANDERS , TACTICAL WARFARE , HORSES , REPRINTS , LESSONS LEARNED , THEATER LEVEL OPERATIONS , RAILROADS , FIRST WORLD WAR , MILITARY HISTORY , MILITARY TRANSPORTATION


Subject Categories : Humanities and History
      Logistics, Military Facilities and Supplies
      Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE