Accession Number : ADA515216


Title :   Agriculture in Pending U.S. Free Trade Agreements with Colombia, Panama, and South Korea


Descriptive Note : Congressional rept.


Corporate Author : LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE


Personal Author(s) : Jurenas, Remy


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a515216.pdf


Report Date : 04 Feb 2010


Pagination or Media Count : 22


Abstract : The 111th Congress could consider free trade agreements (FTAs) signed by the Bush Administration with Colombia, Panama, and South Korea under trade promotion authority, or fast-track rules, designed to expedite congressional consideration of these agreements. Liberalizing trade in agricultural products, particularly the pace of expanding market access for the more sensitive agricultural commodities, was one of the more difficult areas that trade negotiators faced in concluding each of these FTAs. In each instance, issues dealing with food safety and animal/plant health matters (technically not part of the FTA negotiating agenda) were not resolved until later. While U.S. negotiators sought to eliminate high tariffs and restrictive quotas imposed on U.S. agricultural exports to these three country markets, they also faced pressures to protect U.S. producers of import-sensitive commodities (beef, dairy products, and sugar, among others). FTA partner country negotiators faced similar pressures. One Bush Administration policy objective was for FTAs to be comprehensive (i.e., cover all products). For the more import-sensitive agricultural commodities, negotiators agreed on long transition periods, temporary additional protection in the case of import surges, or indefinite protection of a few commodities. To illustrate the latter, because of political sensitivities for the United States or its partners, negotiators agreed to retain in perpetuity quantitative import limits and prohibitively high tariffs on some of the most import-sensitive commodities. In one exception, though, the United States agreed to Korea's insistence that rice be completely excluded from their FTA. Of these three, the FTA with South Korea would be the most commercially significant one for U.S. agriculture since the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) took effect with Mexico in 1994.


Descriptors :   *INTERNATIONAL TRADE , *EXPORTS , *COMMODITIES , COMMERCE , MARKETING , GOVERNMENT(FOREIGN) , HEALTH , SAFETY , TRANSITIONS , AGREEMENTS , KOREA , FOOD , AGRICULTURE , LEGISLATION , SOUTH KOREA , COLOMBIA , PLANTS(BOTANY) , PANAMA , MEXICO , POLICIES , DAIRY PRODUCTS , CONGRESS , UNITED STATES


Subject Categories : Economics and Cost Analysis


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE