Accession Number : ADA494854


Title :   The U.N. Convention Against Torture: Overview of U.S. Implementation Policy Concerning the Removal of Aliens


Descriptive Note : Congressional rept.


Corporate Author : LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE


Personal Author(s) : Garcia, Michael J


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a494854.pdf


Report Date : 21 Jan 2009


Pagination or Media Count : 20


Abstract : The United Nations Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT) requires signatory parties to take measures to end torture within their territorial jurisdictions. For purposes of the Convention, torture is defined as an extreme form of cruel and inhuman punishment committed under the color of law. The Convention allows for no circumstances or emergencies where torture could be permitted. Additionally, CAT Article 3 requires that no state party expel, return, or extradite a person to another country where there are substantial grounds to believe he would be subjected to torture. CAT Article 3 does not expressly prohibit persons from being removed to countries where they would face cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment not rising to the level of torture. The United States ratified CAT subject to certain declarations, reservations, and understandings, including that the Convention was not self-executing, and therefore required domestic implementing legislation to take effect. In accordance with CAT Article 3, the United States enacted statutes and regulations to prohibit the transfer of aliens to countries where they would be tortured, including the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998, chapter 113C of the United States Criminal Code, and certain regulations implemented and enforced by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Justice (DOJ), and the Department of State. These authorities, which require the withholding or deferral of the removal of an alien to a country where he is more likely than not to be tortured, generally provide aliens already residing within the United States a greater degree of protection than aliens arriving to the United States who are deemed inadmissible on security- or terrorism-related grounds.


Descriptors :   *LAW ENFORCEMENT , *POLICIES , *PUNISHMENT , INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS , UNITED NATIONS , UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT , LEGISLATION


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Sociology and Law


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE