Accession Number : ADA490636


Title :   Pacific Currents: The Responses of U.S. Allies and Security Partners in East Asia to China's Rise


Corporate Author : RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA


Personal Author(s) : Medeiros, Evan S ; Crane, Keith ; Heginbotham, Eric ; Levin, Norman D ; Lowell, Julia F ; Rabasa, Angel ; Seong, Somi


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a490636.pdf


Report Date : Jan 2008


Pagination or Media Count : 310


Abstract : China's growing involvement and influence in East Asian economic and security affairs are not fundamentally eroding the foundation of U.S. alliance and security partnerships in the region. None of the six nations covered in this book-Australia, Japan, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand-see China as a viable strategic a alternative to the United States. The United States remains the security partner of choice in the region. But consistent U.S. efforts are needed to ensure this situation continues in perpetuity. China, however, is changing some U.S. alliances and security partnerships in Asia. In many cases, China makes U.S. security commitments even more relevant: Nations can confidently engage China precisely because U.S. security commitments endure. However, America's Asian allies and partners are increasingly seeking to maximize their maneuvering room by positioning themselves to benefit from ties with both China and the United States. On balance, America's Asian allies and security partners want continued U.S. involvement in the region, but sometimes only in certain ways, at certain times, and on particular issues. What is not occurring in Asia in response to China's rise is as important as what is occurring. Contrary to media reporting, East Asia is not gradually falling under China's hegemony, at least not the six nations addressed here. China is not gradually and surreptitiously pushing the United States out of the region or otherwise making it irrelevant. Regional states are not climbing on a Chinese bandwagon in expectation of its eventual hegemony. The United States and China are jockeying for power and influence, but not in a zero-sum manner.


Descriptors :   *FOREIGN POLICY , *INTERNATIONAL POLITICS , *INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS , *NATIONAL SECURITY , CHINA , ASIA , MILITARY PLANNING , PHILIPPINES , UNITED STATES , POSITION FINDING


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Military Intelligence


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE