Accession Number : ADA485852


Title :   International Population Assistance and Family Planning Programs: Issues for Congress


Descriptive Note : Congressional rept.


Corporate Author : LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE


Personal Author(s) : Blanchfield, Luisa


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a485852.pdf


Report Date : 24 Jul 2008


Pagination or Media Count : 23


Abstract : Since 1965, the U.S. Government has supported international population planning based on principles of volunteerism and informed choice that gives participants access to information on all methods of birth control. This policy, however, has generated contentious debate for over two decades, resulting in frequent clarification and modification of U.S. international family planning programs. In 1984, controversy arose over U.S. population aid policy when the Reagan Administration introduced restrictions, which became known as the Mexico City policy. The Mexico City policy denies U.S. funds to foreign nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that perform or promote abortion as a method of family planning -- even if the activities are undertaken with non-U.S. funds. Presidents Reagan and George H. W. Bush also banned grants to the U.N. Population Fund (UNFPA) due to evidence of coercive family planning practices in China. President Clinton resumed UNFPA funding and repealed the Mexico City policy in 1993. President George W. Bush, however, re-applied the Mexico City restrictions. Following a State Department investigation of family planning programs in China, the Administration suspended U.S. contributions to UNFPA in 2002, citing violations of the Kemp-Kasten amendment. This provision bans U.S. assistance to organizations that support or participate in the management of coercive family planning programs. The suspension of U.S. contributions to UNFPA has continued through FY2008. On December 26, 2007, the President signed into law H.R. 2764, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008 (P.L. 110-161), which directs that $395 million be made available for bilateral family planning activities. The Act also designates $40 million for UNFPA if it is determined eligible under the Kemp-Kasten amendment. On June 26, 2008, the Administration announced that UNFPA was ineligible for FY2008 funding under Kemp-Kasten.


Descriptors :   *PLANNING , *FOREIGN AID , *POPULATION , *FEDERAL BUDGETS , *ORGANIZATIONS , *LEGISLATION , *UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT , *INTERNATIONAL , CHINA , BIRTH , OBSTETRICS , WOMEN , PREGNANCY , HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUSES , UNITED NATIONS , ABORTION , MEDICAL SERVICES , CONTRACEPTION , DEVELOPING NATIONS , POLICIES


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Sociology and Law
      Medicine and Medical Research


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE