Accession Number : ADA483393


Title :   Armed Peacekeepers in Bosnia


Descriptive Note : Monograph


Corporate Author : ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS COMBAT STUDIES INST


Personal Author(s) : Baumann, Robert F ; Gawrych, George W ; Kretchik, Walter E


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a483393.pdf


Report Date : Jan 2004


Pagination or Media Count : 251


Abstract : With the aid of a generous grant from the U.S. Institute of Peace, the authors were able to access and examine relevant documents, interview numerous participants, and visit U.S. and NATO forces in Bosnia. As a result of their labors, they have provided the reader with an analytical narrative that covers the background to the crisis in Bosnia, the largely ineffectual efforts of the United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR) to stop the civil war there between 1992 and 1995, the Dayton Peace Accords of 1995 that produced a framework for ending the civil war and consolidating the peace, the frenetic planning that led to the deployment of U.S. forces as part of the NATO-led multinational force (Operation Joint Endeavor), and the transition of that Implementation Force (IFOR) to the Stabilization Force (SFOR) a year later. The authors shed light on several of the critical military lessons that have emerged from the U.S. experience in Bosnia -- an involvement that continues as of this writing. In general, these lessons cover the cooperation and contention present in virtually any coalition undertaking; the complexity of the local situation and the ways in which strictly military tasks have political, social, economic, and cultural ramifications that the military cannot ignore or avoid; the inevitable adjustments peacekeepers have to make to dynamic and precarious situations; and the often unaccommodating role history plays when confronted with concerns about force protection, mission creep, end states, and early exits. In Bosnia, a U.S. military force trained and equipped to fight a highly technological, conventional war found itself making adjustments that resulted in performing tasks that many officers considered unconventional and unorthodox.


Descriptors :   *MILITARY FORCES(UNITED STATES) , *LESSONS LEARNED , *MILITARY HISTORY , *NATO FORCES , *BOSNIA HERZEGOVINA , *PEACEKEEPING , *POSTWAR OPERATIONS , RIOT CONTROL , FIELD GRADE OFFICERS , SLOVENIA , FIRST WORLD WAR , INFORMATION WARFARE , SECOND WORLD WAR , SECTARIAN VIOLENCE , CIVIL DISTURBANCES , CROATIA , CIVIL AFFAIRS , MILITARY PLANNING , UNITED NATIONS , MINE CLEARANCE , STABILIZATION , SERBIA


Subject Categories : Unconventional Warfare


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE