Accession Number : ADA483388


Title :   Europe's Role in Nation-Building: From the Balkans to the Congo


Descriptive Note : Monograph


Corporate Author : RAND CORP ARLINGTON VA NATIONAL SECURITY RESEARCH DIV


Personal Author(s) : Dobbins, James ; Jones, Seth G ; Crane, Keith ; Chivvis, Christopher S ; Radin, Andrew ; Larrabee, F S ; Bensahel, Nora ; Stearns, Brooke K ; Goldsmith, Benjamin W


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a483388.pdf


Report Date : Jan 2008


Pagination or Media Count : 345


Abstract : Since 1989, nation building has become a growth industry. In two prior volumes, RAND has analyzed the United States' and United Nations' (UN's) performance in this sphere, examining instances in which one or the other led such operations. In this monograph, RAND looks at Europe's performance, taking six instances in which European institutions or national governments have exercised comparable leadership. To complete their survey of modern nation building, they have also included a chapter describing Australia's operation in the Solomon Islands. This is not a comprehensive study of all nation-building operations that have involved European countries. Rather, it is a study of the European role in six cases in which the European Union or a European government led all or a key part of such an operation: Albania, Sierra Leone, Macedonia, Cote d'Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Bosnia. There are obvious difficulties in distinguishing among U.S.-, UN-, and European-led nation building, since many international peace operations involve the participation of all three. Nevertheless, it should make a difference whether military command is being exercised from Washington, New York, Brussels, Paris, or London. This study was intended to explore those differences. Previous volumes looked at the distinctive U.S. and UN approaches to these sorts of missions. This one seeks to determine whether there is an identifiable European way of nation building, and if so, what the United States can learn from it. In the final chapter, the authors compare the six European- and one Australian-led interventions covered in this volume with the 15 other U.S.- or UN-led operations described in their previous volumes. They use both quantitative and qualitative measures to compare inputs, including military personnel levels, economic assistance, and duration, and such outcomes as levels of security, economic growth, refugee return, and political reform achieved.


Descriptors :   *POSTWAR OPERATIONS , *EUROPEAN UNION , *PEACEKEEPING , *MACEDONIA , *IVORY COAST , *ALBANIA , *ZAIRE , *BOSNIA HERZEGOVINA , *GOVERNMENT(FOREIGN) , AUSTRALIA , CIVIL AFFAIRS , HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE , DEMOCRACY , UNITED KINGDOM , UNITED NATIONS , MILITARY FORCES(UNITED STATES) , FRANCE , CASE STUDIES , SECURITY , MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN) , ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT , NATO , ITALY


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Military Forces and Organizations
      Unconventional Warfare


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE