Accession Number : ADA481925


Title :   Development of a Toolbox Using Chemical, Physical and Biological Technologies for Decontamination of Sediments to Support Strategic Army Response to Natural Disasters


Descriptive Note : Conference paper


Corporate Author : ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER PICATINNY ARSENAL NJ


Personal Author(s) : Herbst, D ; Niles, P L ; Niles, J ; Larson, S ; Medina, V ; Sheehan, P L


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a481925.pdf


Report Date : Nov 2006


Pagination or Media Count : 6


Abstract : Environmental technologies, developed by the Department of Defense for life cycle management of energetic materials can be leveraged for use in pollution prevention and remediation of a broad range of compounds and impact scenarios (Downey et al., 2006). The Environmental Security Initiative (ESI) and Natural Disaster Response Initiative (NDRI) are examples of programs developed by the US Military to transition and adapt technologies developed for energetics to the cleanup of environmental and strategic resources resulting from new pollution threats caused by natural disasters and potentially, terrorist activities. This paper describes preliminary testing results for physical, chemical and biological treatment methods transitioned from remediation of energetic impacted materials to remediation of sediments deposited by hurricane Katrina. Results were combined into a data-base toolbox and used to develop a Venn diagram/decision matrix for rapid selection and application of appropriate remediation technologies in emergency situations. Technologies considered include stabilization or emulsification (of metals, organic contaminants, and pathogens); biological treatment (for pathogen destruction, organic degradation and material recycling); and chemical oxidation (for destruction of organic and inorganic chemicals, and pathogens). Results of this preliminary study show a five fold reduction in lead concentration in sediments treated with chemical agents such as lime, asphalt based emulsion and tall oil pitch (also known as pine pitch) emulsions. The application of a chemical disinfectant to eliminate pathogens, however, reduced the effectiveness of the emulsifier by about 8%. Leachable organics were reduced 3 to 6 fold when treated with the emulsifier and appeared to be independent of the chemical disinfectant. The work reported here is a preliminary report of on-going research.


Descriptors :   *DECONTAMINATION , *SEDIMENTS , HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE , EMULSIONS , SOIL REMEDIATION , NATURAL DISASTERS , WASTE TREATMENT , SYMPOSIA , CALCIUM OXIDES


Subject Categories : Solid Wastes Pollution and Control


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE