Accession Number : ADA480270


Title :   Evolution of Burn Resuscitation in Operation Iraqi Freedom


Descriptive Note : Journal article


Corporate Author : ARMY INST OF SURGICAL RESEARCH FORT SAM HOUSTON TX


Personal Author(s) : Chung, Kevin K ; Blackbourne, Lorne H ; Wolf, Steven E ; White, Chrsitopher E ; Renz, Evan M ; Cancio, Leopoldo C ; Holcomb, John B ; Barillo, David J


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a480270.pdf


Report Date : Oct 2006


Pagination or Media Count : 8


Abstract : Burns are common in all military conflicts, comprising approximately 10% of all casualties. Of these, nearly 20% are categorized as severe, or involving greater than 20% TBSA, and require significant intravenous resuscitation. A unique set of challenges have emerged during the present conflict associated with global evacuation of burned soldiers, adding a new dimension to the already complex and often-controversial topic of the burn resuscitation. Critical advances in air evacuation of the war wounded, thorough prewar planning, and sustained burn care education of deployed personnel have proven vital in the optimal care of our injured soldiers. During the Vietnam conflict, burned soldiers were evacuated to an Army Hospital in Japan (Camp Zama) and were treated for up to 6 months before they were evacuated to the United States. Since that time, the transfer of the patient to the burn center for definitive care has been expedited by the Army Burn Flight Team's ability to transport the most severely burned patients within the first several days after injury. With the emergence of the U.S. Air Force Critical Care Air Transport Team (CCATT) program in the 1990s, global air evacuation of burn patients became even more rapid, maximizing available U.S. Air Force aircraft for patient evacuation. The doctrine has shifted from aeromedical transport of the stable to aeromedical transport of the stabilized. In burn patients, evacuation presents a unique problem because it usually takes place while resuscitation in the first 24 to 48 hours after burn injury is ongoing. In addition to the innate complexity involved in global evacuation, war burn patients often exhibit multisystem traumatic injuries further complicating and augmenting resuscitation fluid needs above and beyond standard burn resuscitation formulas. The presence of smoke inhalation injury, occurring in 5% to 15% of patients with severe burns, also increases fluid requirements.


Descriptors :   *RESUSCITATION , *BURNS(INJURIES) , *AEROMEDICAL EVACUATION , REPRINTS , OPTIMIZATION , MILITARY AIRCRAFT , FLUIDS , PATIENTS , AIR TRANSPORTATION


Subject Categories : Medicine and Medical Research
      Escape, Rescue and Survival


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE