Accession Number : ADA471230


Title :   Negotiation in the New Strategic Environment: Lessons From Iraq


Descriptive Note : Conference paper


Corporate Author : ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA CENTER FOR STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP


Personal Author(s) : Tressler, David M


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a471230.pdf


Report Date : Aug 2007


Pagination or Media Count : 124


Abstract : U.S. soldiers in Iraq from junior to senior leaders conduct thousands of negotiations with Iraqi leaders while pursuing tactical and operational objectives that affect the strategic import of the U.S. mission in that country. As long as U.S. troops operate under conditions like the ones they currently face while at the same time conducting a counterinsurgency and stability, security, transition, and reconstruction (SSTR) operation in Iraq, negotiation will be a common activity and an important part of achieving mission objectives. Lessons from experience negotiating in Iraq can be helpful in future operations. This monograph argues that the negotiations conducted in Iraq have tactical importance, operational significance, and strategic implications because of the daily role they play in the missions U.S. soldiers conduct while attempting to secure neighborhoods, strengthen political institutions, acquire information and intelligence, and gain cooperation. The aggregate effect of so many successful or failed negotiations has an impact on the ability of the U.S. military to accomplish its operational mission there efficiently and effectively as well as meet American strategic goals. vii The armed services have centers for lessons learned, combat training centers, and a variety of schools for continued training and development of their soldiers and leaders, but there has been no formal study of the negotiating experience that U.S. military officers and noncommissioned officers have gained and the lessons they have learned over the course of their tours in Iraq or Afghanistan that applies the broader field of negotiation theory and its literature to the practical needs of the U.S. military in conducting those negotiations.


Descriptors :   *IRAQ , *MILITARY FACILITIES , *LESSONS LEARNED , *MILITARY TRAINING , *STRATEGIC ANALYSIS , *LEADERSHIP , *OFFICER PERSONNEL , MILITARY PERSONNEL , AFGHANISTAN , NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS , FIELD THEORY , COUNTERINSURGENCY , NEGOTIATIONS , ARMY PERSONNEL , AGGREGATES(MATERIALS) , DAILY OCCURRENCE , COOPERATION , MISSIONS , TRAVEL


Subject Categories : Personnel Management and Labor Relations
      Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE