Accession Number : ADA457252


Title :   Analysis Methods and Models for Small Unit Operations


Descriptive Note : Final rept.


Corporate Author : TNO DEFENCE SECURITY AND SAFETY SOESTERBERG (NETHERLANDS)


Personal Author(s) : Brandsma, M G ; van Vliet, A J ; Griffioen-Young, H J


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a457252.pdf


Report Date : Jul 2006


Pagination or Media Count : 65


Abstract : One of the primary goals of the Netherlands Armed Forces is to have at their disposal units that are adequately equipped and outfitted to carry out tasks across the complete range of peace-supporting missions, varying in levels of hostility. To this end a scientific research program was formulated which encompasses a number of projects which focus on various aspects of operations of teams of dismounted soldiers. The aim of this project is to identify scientific methods and models which facilitate the measurement of operational effectiveness of dismounted small units. Measuring operational effectiveness of dismounted small units requires the use of methods models and simulations. Within this project we have made an inventory of the available methods and models within the TNO technology portfolio. In order to be able to asses the usefulness of these methods and models for the tasks the dismounted small units are confronted with, the task decomposition developed in the project Small unit tactics in peace keeping operations' (Smeenk et al., 2004) was used as a guideline. The usefulness of the methods and models was established by classifying these into three categories, i.e. logically possible, theoretically feasible and practically applicable. For each of the tasks the models and methods were reviewed with respect to the mentioned categories. This resulted in one matrix of tasks and models/methods. The analysis of the matrix suggests that not one single method/model is practically applicable to all the identified tasks of the dismounted small unit. Furthermore, although TNO has access to a range of models/methods which are practically applicable to a number of tasks, these tasks can al be considered as high intensity tasks. TNO does not have access to methods/models which are explicitly and practical applicable in the low intensity range of the task spectrum. A small number of models seem to have the potential to fill the identified gap.


Descriptors :   *MILITARY PERSONNEL , *OPERATIONAL READINESS , *OPERATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS , MATHEMATICAL MODELS , MILITARY OPERATIONS , MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN) , OPERATIONS RESEARCH , PSYCHOMETRICS , WORKLOAD , PROBLEM SOLVING , PERFORMANCE(HUMAN) , NETHERLANDS , WARFARE , SIMULATION


Subject Categories : Operations Research
      Military Forces and Organizations
      Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE