Accession Number : ADA437516


Title :   Operational Shock Complexity Theory


Descriptive Note : Monograph rept.


Corporate Author : ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES


Personal Author(s) : Blakesley, Paul J


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a437516.pdf


Report Date : 26 May 2005


Pagination or Media Count : 115


Abstract : The scientific revolution, ushered in by Newtonian laws, had a major impact on Western military thinking. By believing in the power of reductionism, planners were taught to decompose problems into their constituent parts and solve them, almost in isolation. This analysis was followed by a synthesis of the constituent parts in order to solve the problem. The use of systems theory in war offers another approach to Newtonian science. Armies mimic complex adaptive systems by exhibiting a self-organizing capability that prevents them from slipping into chaos. A complex system adapts to its surroundings and learns from its interactions. This learning enables the system to maximize its position vis-a- -vis its environment and can lead to an emergence of a new and unexpected system that cannot be predicted from the original elements. These new sciences stress non-linearity and the need to view problems holistically. Despite recognizing the change in the environment and the enemy, US Army doctrine is still rooted in the symmetrical battle concept and many current theoretical models do not adequately deal with the increasing complexity of war. This monograph suggests that the analysis of complexity and chaos can provide a more framework for operational shock.


Descriptors :   *MILITARY OPERATIONS , *MILITARY DOCTRINE , *SYMMETRY , *THEORY , MATHEMATICAL MODELS , ARMY , LEARNING , SELF ORGANIZING SYSTEMS , BATTLES , ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS , NONLINEAR SYSTEMS , SYNTHESIS , WARFARE


Subject Categories : Theoretical Mathematics
      Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE