Accession Number : ADA429668


Title :   The Philippine Insurrection: The U.S. Navy in a Military Operation Other Than War, 1899-1902


Descriptive Note : Master's thesis


Corporate Author : NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA


Personal Author(s) : Carlson, Ted W


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a429668.pdf


Report Date : Dec 2004


Pagination or Media Count : 221


Abstract : U.S. naval doctrine has been dominated by the Mahanian concept of massing large capital ships for over one hundred years. Yet, it was a Cyclone-class patrol craft, a USCG cutter, and an Australian frigate that pushed up the Khor-Abd-Allah waterway and opened up the port of Umm Qasr, Iraq, during the Second Gulf War. They continue to protect it and the surrounding oil infrastructure from insurgent and terrorist attacks today. With the navy's current interest in transformation, the question arises, is the navy as presently configured well suited for today's threats? This thesis explores the question of how should the navy meet threats to national interests. This is accomplished through historical analysis of an event that is similar to the situation today: The Philippine Insurrection (1899-1902). This episode showcases the shortcomings of the navy's conventional approach to military operations other than war, and the need for change. In today's asymmetric environment, the past provides insight into effective means for handling these types of threats. This thesis concludes that the navy needs to diversify itself to incorporate different ship platforms, platforms that incorporate the utility of old with the technology of new.


Descriptors :   *MILITARY FORCES(UNITED STATES) , *NAVAL OPERATIONS , *OPERATIONS OTHER THAN WAR , MILITARY DOCTRINE , THESES , PHILIPPINES


Subject Categories : Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE