Accession Number : ADA372860


Title :   Preventing Deadly Conflict


Descriptive Note : Final rept.


Corporate Author : CARNEGIE CORP OF NEW YORK


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a372860.pdf


Report Date : Dec 1997


Pagination or Media Count : 301


Abstract : Three inescapable observations form the foundation of this report. First, deadly conflict is not inevitable. Violence on the scale of what we have seen in Bosnia, Rwanda, Somalia, and elsewhere does not emerge inexorably from human interaction. Second, the need to prevent deadly conflict is increasingly urgent. The rapid compression of the world through breathtaking population growth, technological advancement, and economic interdependence, combined with the readily available supply of deadly weapons and easily transmitted contagion of hatred and incitement to violence, make it essential and urgent to find ways to prevent disputes from turning massively violent. Third, preventing deadly conflict is possible. The problem is not that we do not know about incipient and large-scale violence; it is that we often do not act. Examples from hot spots around the world illustrate that the potential for violence can be defused through the early, skillful, and integrated application of political, diplomatic, economic, and military measures. The Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict does not believe in the unavoidable clash of civilizations or in an inevitably violent future. War and mass violence usually result from deliberate political decisions, and the Commission believes that these decisions can be affected so that mass violence does not result. To undertake effective preventive action, the Commission believes that we must develop an international commitment to the concept of prevention, a habit of preventive investment, more effective regimes for controlling destructive weaponry, and a working portfolio of legal standards that rest on a normative consensus regarding the responsibilities of governments to each other and to their peoples. Responsible leaders, key intergovernmental and nongovernmental institutions, and civil society can do far better in preventing deadly conflict than the record of this century and the current epidemic of violence suggest. c


Descriptors :   *CRISIS MANAGEMENT , *CONFLICT , *PREVENTION , *PANEL(COMMITTEE) , WEAPONS , WARFARE , POLITICAL SCIENCE , DECISION MAKING , PEACETIME , SOCIETIES , HUMANS , INTERACTIONS , GROWTH(GENERAL) , DESTRUCTION , POPULATION , STANDARDS , HOT SPOTS , SOMALIA , CIVIL AFFAIRS , LAW ENFORCEMENT , BOSNIA HERZEGOVINA , RWANDA


Subject Categories : Administration and Management
      Sociology and Law


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE