Accession Number : ADA265317


Title :   The Drug War: Applying the Lessons of Vietnam


Descriptive Note : Final rept.,


Corporate Author : NAVAL WAR COLL NEWPORT RI DEPT OF OPERATIONS


Personal Author(s) : Shear, Wayne G


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a265317.pdf


Report Date : 22 Feb 1993


Pagination or Media Count : 37


Abstract : By applying the lessons of Vietnam a new concept of operations is suggested which eliminates active interdiction by the U.S. military in the drug war. The current use of force is not furthering the strategic objective of reducing drug use in the United States, indeed, after four years of active military involvement, the cocaine market is saturated. The root causes of the war are not amenable to a military solution and the use of force is making the situation worse. This paper does not focus on the drug control policies of the United States nor does it attempt to analyze the organization or tactical employment of forces, rather it criticizes the operational concept which links the two. The problems encountered by the U.S. Military in stemming the drug supply are found to be similar to those faced in Vietnam. A strategic estimate of the drug producing region shows that military action spreads the production of cocaine, strengthens and diversifies the drug industry, and exacerbates political, economic and social problems in Latin America. Limiting the U.S. military to detecting and monitoring the drug supply will stabilize the price for cocaine and reduce the incentive to produce and ship the drug. Ultimately lower prices will drive down the drug supply and give U.S. diplomatic, economic and social programs an opportunity to work.


Descriptors :   *DRUGS , MILITARY OPERATIONS , CONTROL , SHIPS , UNITED STATES , INDUSTRIES , POLICIES , ORGANIZATIONS , PRODUCTION , EMPLOYMENT , ECONOMICS , MONITORING , INTERDICTION , REGIONS , ESTIMATES , OPERATION , DRIVES , WORK , STEMMING , VIETNAM , LATIN AMERICA , COCAINE , SUPPLIES


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Pharmacology
      Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE