Accession Number : ADA264204


Title :   Peace Operations: Forging the Instruments and Keeping the Edge


Descriptive Note : Individual study project,


Corporate Author : ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA


Personal Author(s) : Forster, Larry M


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a264204.pdf


Report Date : 02 Apr 1993


Pagination or Media Count : 46


Abstract : As the United States seeks a comprehensive national strategy to meet the challenges of the post Cold War era, there is a strong likelihood that such a strategy will embrace, at least in part, multilateral operations under the imprimatur of the United Nations. President Clinton has endorsed the idea of greater UN Military role, 1 and one of his advisors is an advocate of a practical internationalism that relies on an UN rapid reaction force 2 for peace operations. The United Nations appears to provide an attractive framework through which the US could pursue certain national interests, because it has stature to be a forum for conflict resolution and the structure to channel resources to needy nations and groups. Particularly with respect to peacekeeping and related operations, the United Nations offers a means cope with ethnic turmoil and threats to international peace and stability. Through the UN, the United States could enjoy certain economies of scale, enhance the credibility of its foreign policy, and remain collectively engaged (selective multilateral involvement) while pursuing national interests. As a result, a more intensive US-UN partnership for the promotion of peace (defined as an absence of conflict) and other mutual interests will be a likely feature of future U.S. Foreign policy.


Descriptors :   *FOREIGN POLICY , *UNITED NATIONS , *INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS , MILITARY FORCES(UNITED STATES) , FOREIGN AID , MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS , WESTERN SECURITY(INTERNATIONAL) , INTERNATIONAL POLITICS


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE