Accession Number : ADA262561


Title :   Tactical Implications for Peacemaking in Ethnic Conflict


Corporate Author : ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES


Personal Author(s) : Kelley, John M


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a262561.pdf


Report Date : 04 Feb 1993


Pagination or Media Count : 70


Abstract : Ethnic conflict is emerging as the dominant threat to world peace in the post-World War II security environment. The scope and frequency of ethnic conflict threatens world stability and could infringe on U.S. vital interests. The U.S. and the UN are involved in peace restoration operations in 13 ethnic conflicts worldwide. The U.S. Army accomplished the peacemaking mission in the past and will be challenged with peacemaking in the future. This monograph analyzes experiences from Operation Provide Comfort for tactical findings useful for formulating U.S. ground forces' peacemaking doctrine. The study begins by establishing the relevance of Operation Provide Comfort as a tool to examine peacemaking. The analysis uses 'Operations Other than War' from the emerging doctrine in Field Manual 100-5, Operations to review the Kurdish-Iraqi ethnic conflict. Three trends emerged. First, unity of command is a means to achieve unity of effort; but unity of effort is achievable without unity of command. Second, units exhibited great versatility. Third, the Army does not need dedicated forces for peacemaking in ethnic conflict. The study focuses on the emerging doctrinal principle of unity of effort and the tenet of versatility. Unity of effort and versatility are used to analyze six functional areas from Operation Provide Comfort. The six functions analyzed were: security, air operations, fire support, engineering, intelligence, and medical operations. The study found that Army forces thrived under the Operation Provide Comfort Coalition's unity of effort. The study concludes that the Army should further conventional forces versatility by adapting and modifying collateral activities already found in Special Forces doctrine.


Descriptors :   *SECURITY , *MEDICAL SERVICES , *FIRE SUPPORT , *SPECIAL FORCES , *AIR FORCE OPERATIONS , MILITARY OPERATIONS , STABILITY , INTERNATIONAL POLITICS , THREATS , MILITARY DOCTRINE , MISSIONS , ARMY , INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS , CATALYTIC CONFLICT(WARFARE) , MILITARY ENGINEERS


Subject Categories : Military Forces and Organizations
      Military Intelligence
      Unconventional Warfare


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE