Accession Number : ADA262075


Title :   China's Response to the 'New World Order'.


Descriptive Note : Research rept. Aug 1991-Apr 1992,


Corporate Author : INDUSTRIAL COLL OF THE ARMED FORCES WASHINGTON DC


Personal Author(s) : Campbell, Jay A


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a262075.pdf


Report Date : Apr 1992


Pagination or Media Count : 35


Abstract : As world change swept the globe over the very recent past, U.S. President George Bush described an emerging 'new world order.' He stated a belief that the American system should form the basis of a new international system. He further stated that the U.S. must seek to take the lead in the new order forming such an international system. China is the largest of the very few remaining Marxist-Leninist states. As the third leg of the former world strategic triangle, China remained a challenge to U.S. foreign policy throughout the Cold War. Now that the Cold War is over, China is integral to the formulation of any new order. China's long history and cultural background differ significantly from America's. It is important that the U.S. understand, to the extent possible, how those differences will be reflected in China's response to the new world order. A review of Sino-American relations since normalization in the early 1970's shows reform that brought China increasingly closer to the U.S. until the Tiananmen Square tradegy in June, 1989. Since then, world events such as the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe, the Unification of Germany, U.S. dominance in Operation Desert Storm and the Soviet Coup have had great effect on China's leaders and the course of reform.


Descriptors :   *FOREIGN POLICY , UNITED STATES , POLITICAL SCIENCE , CULTURE , CHINA


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE