Accession Number : ADA260635


Title :   Situational Force Scoring: Accounting for Combined Arms Effects in Aggregate Combat Models


Descriptive Note : Research rept.


Corporate Author : RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA


Personal Author(s) : Allen, Patrick


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a260635.pdf


Report Date : Jan 1992


Pagination or Media Count : 112


Abstract : The situational force scoring (SFS) methodology has two objectives: (1) to improve the representation of ground force close combat in aggregate combat models that use scores of one form or another to compute force ratio, attrition, and movement as a result of combat; and (2) to provide an alternative extrapolation mechanism for use in more-detailed weapon-on-weapon models that depend on data that are available only for a modest number of calibration points. SFS seeks to accomplish the first objective by adjusting the scores dynamically to reflect the effects of type of terrain, type of battle, and combined arms imbalances or shortages on each side's effective force scores. The SFS methodology significantly mitigates many long-standing problems of aggregate models, such as their underestimating the relative value of light units even in situations where they are in fact highly effective, even more effective than armored units. For example, infantry in prepared defenses in urban or mountainous terrain can be very effective against armor, but this relative effectiveness is ignored in aggregate combat models, which do not account for this situation. Combat models that ignore these effects are likely to be biased against infantry and in favor of armor. An example of a combined arms effect with respect to force mix is the suppressive effect of artillery in support of an armor and infantry assault, especially against prepared or fortified defenses. The benefit of the attacker's artillery is not in just the targets it destroys, but in the effect its fires have on suppressing the enemy's ability to engage friendly attacking maneuver assets. Even an aggregate model should represent the limited ability of an attacker to successfully penetrate prepared defenses without sufficient artillery support. Aggregate models employing the SFS will be useful in policy analysis, higher-level wargaming, and screening studies trying to make first-cut assessments of alternative force mixes.


Descriptors :   *INFANTRY , *WAR GAMES , *MILITARY PLANNING , *COMBAT FORCES , *ARTILLERY UNITS , *ARMORED VEHICLES , *SCORING , METHODOLOGY , ATTRITION , COMBAT SIMULATION , URBAN WARFARE , TERRAIN , SHORTAGES , BATTLES , LETHALITY , CASUALTIES , VULNERABILITY , COMBAT EFFECTIVENESS


Subject Categories : Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE