Accession Number : ADA260311


Title :   Oil and the New World System: CENTCOM Rethinks Its Mission


Descriptive Note : Final rept.


Corporate Author : ARMY WAR COLL STRATEGIC STUDIES INST CARLISLE BARRACKS PA


Personal Author(s) : Johnson, Douglas V ; Pelletiere, Stephen C


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a260311.pdf


Report Date : 08 Dec 1992


Pagination or Media Count : 42


Abstract : The authors attempt to define the role of the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) in the 1990s now that the United States remains as the single superpower. The authors argue that the loss of the Soviet Union as a foe of the United States has not diminished CENTCOM's role as the guardian of the Persian Gulf. The new international system that has replaced bipolarity cannot survive without oil from Saudi Arabia. The industrialized West not only must be assured of dependable supplies but also of acceptable prices. As long as Iran and Iraq remain recalcitrant enemies of the Gulf monarchs and the West, a constant threat is posed to U.S. interests. The argument is rejected that Saudi Arabia and the other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states can defend themselves; only CENTCOM can do that. However, at a time of shrinking financial resources, economies must be made. The solution is to focus all of CENTCOM's efforts on the Gulf, abandoning practically all other responsibilities, which now are relics of the cold war. U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM), Persian Gulf, Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Gulf Cooperation Council(GCC), cold war, Somalia, international.


Descriptors :   *THREATS , *PERSIAN GULF , *OILS , USSR , TIME , RESOURCES , INTERNATIONAL , IRAN , SAUDI ARABIA , ARABIA , COOPERATION , SUPPLIES , SOMALIA , ENEMY , COLD WAR , IRAQ , UNITED STATES


Subject Categories : Geography
      Lubricants and Hydraulic Fluids


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE