Accession Number : ADA259717


Title :   Media Predictions in Operations Desert Shield/Desert Storm


Descriptive Note : Master's thesis


Corporate Author : ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS


Personal Author(s) : Monnett, Michael G


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a259717.pdf


Report Date : 05 Jun 1992


Pagination or Media Count : 100


Abstract : This thesis examines predictions journalists made during the Gulf War, to include whether or not force would be used, and, if so, how. Predictions that might have caused security violations were examined, as was the military's use of the media to further deception plans. Content analysis was also used to determine whether or not sociological trends could be vectored using an analytical approach. In an age of continuing friction between the military and the media, this study takes a unique approach in looking at a different aspect of the relationship; how, in retrospect reporters may have helped or hurt the effort through predictions they made. Content analysis in this study worked. Trends toward the actual events that occurred were evident for the breakdown of diplomacy, the conduct of an air campaign, and a around assault. The technique might prove to be useful for application to find trends in ongoing events. The study concludes that journalists as a group correctly predicted events. I found one article that could have posed security problems for U.S. and coalition forces, but numerous articles supporting the deception story existed.... Media, Public affairs, Desert storm, Gulf War, Predictions, Content analysis.


Descriptors :   *MEDIA , *DECEPTION , *OKINAWA , TEST AND EVALUATION , REQUIREMENTS , WARFARE , ORGANIZATIONS , PREDICTIONS , ASSAULT , ARMY , FRICTION , APPROACH , FIELD ARMY , ISLANDS , BATTLES , CONFLICT , SECURITY , THESES , JAPAN , OPERATION , BACKGROUND


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Geography
      Countermeasures


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE