Accession Number : ADA259109


Title :   Physical Fitness as It Pertains to Sustained Military Operations


Descriptive Note : Final rept.


Corporate Author : NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SAN DIEGO CA


Personal Author(s) : Hodgdon, James A


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a259109.pdf


Report Date : May 1986


Pagination or Media Count : 44


Abstract : With the development of the technical ability to maintain almost the same level of combat intensity during the twilight and nighttime hours as during daylight, it appears that combat in the future may require NATO units to perform continuous, high-intensity operations for periods exceeding 48 hours. One of the major effects will be the loss of sleep which leads to decrements in human performance. This chapter considers two general elements of human combat performance, physical performance and mental performance, and explores the relationship of physical fitness to each. Existing literature suggests that sleep deprivation does not affect maximal aerobic power, may affect muscle strength and endurance, does not impair well-learned, gross motor tasks, but does lead to deterioration of the speed with which coordinated hand and are movements can be made. It appears that the physical work rate that can be maintained nearly continuously is related to level of physical fitness. This is the case whether the work rate is limited by the cardiovascular respiratory capacity or muscle physiology. Determination of required levels of fitness for sustaining military operations awaits suitable detailing and physiological measurement during realistic combat scenarios.


Descriptors :   *PERFORMANCE(HUMAN) , *PHYSICAL FITNESS , *COMBAT FORCES , *SLEEP DEPRIVATION , SCENARIOS , MILITARY OPERATIONS , HUMANS , DAYLIGHT , TWILIGHT , DETERIORATION , HIGH INTENSITY , PHYSIOLOGY , INTENSITY , NATO , MEASUREMENT


Subject Categories : Psychology
      Military Forces and Organizations


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE