Accession Number : ADA258023


Title :   A Review of Models of the Human Temperature Regulation System.


Descriptive Note : Interim rept.,


Corporate Author : NAVAL AEROSPACE MEDICAL RESEARCH LAB PENSACOLA FL


Personal Author(s) : Meyer, L. G.


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a258023.pdf


Report Date : 18 FEB 1992


Pagination or Media Count : 62


Abstract : Over the last 100 years, models of temperature regulation have improved our understanding of the body's response to cold as much as scientific experimentation. Models have taken many forms, that is, verbal, pictorial, mechanical, mathematical, and have always been used to predict the body's thermal behavior in changing environmental conditions. Some models have been based on experimental data and some on theories of thermodynamics. As science has advanced, models have become increasingly more complex. However, the use of powerful, high-speed computers has enabled simulations to achieve a formidable level of predictability. Despite the increasing number and sophistication of models of temperature regulation, we have not reached the point where the computer simulation predicts accurately and entirely the complex interactions of the human body. There are many gaps to be filled. This review highlights the development of different models of the biological process of temperature regulation. The objective is to demonstrate the remarkable achievements of models as contributions to the advancement of our knowledge of human temperature regulation, while, at the same time, suggest the need for more explicit and accurate models that include important and previously excluded interactions between physiological systems, such as the cardiovascular and endocrine systems. Models, Temperature regulation, Cold, Endocrine, Simulation, Human, Cardiovascular.


Descriptors :   *TEMPERATURE CONTROL , *HUMAN BODY , *BODY TEMPERATURE , MATHEMATICAL MODELS , SIMULATION , EXPERIMENTAL DATA , MODELS , INTERACTIONS , THERMODYNAMICS , RESPONSE , COMPUTER APPLICATIONS , BEHAVIOR , NEUROLOGY , BODIES , CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.


Subject Categories : ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE