Accession Number : ADA257994


Title :   Long-Term Storage and Preservation of Red Blood Cells,


Corporate Author : LETTERMAN ARMY INST OF RESEARCH PRESIDIO OF SAN FRANCISCO CA DIV OF BLOOD RESEARCH


Personal Author(s) : Moore, Gerald L


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a257994.pdf


Report Date : Jan 1992


Pagination or Media Count : 16


Abstract : Humans have experimented with blood transfusions for over 300 years and have attempted to preserve human blood since the early 1900s. The first modern attempts to store blood were stimulated by World War I when blood was stored in citrate-glucose solutions (Robertson 1918; Rous and Turner 1916). During World War II, the increased need for blood plasma and whole blood resulted in the development of a solution called acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD0 for 21-day refrigerated storage of blood. A slight variation of ACD, called CPD, was introduced in the late 1950s. For CPD, phosphate was added to the citrate and dextrose, which slightly improved the viability of stored red cells, although the dating period was held to 21 days. Blood preservation solutions remained unchanged until the late 1970s when adenine was first added to CPD to produce CPDA-1, which extended the shelf life of blood to 35 days (Peck et al. 1981). CPDA-1 appears to be the industry's final attempt to modify the anticoagulant solution for better blood preservation. However, the success of U.S. and European blood banks with CPDA-1 has encouraged the development of modern additive solutions for component-specific preservation.


Descriptors :   *BLOOD TRANSFUSION , *BLOOD CELLS , *BLOOD PRESERVATION , BLOOD PLASMA , BLOOD BANKS , ACID CITRATE DEXTROSE , BLOOD VOLUME , STERILIZATION


Subject Categories : Biology
      Microbiology


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE