Accession Number : ADA257673


Title :   How Generalizable are Adolescents' Beliefs about Pro-Drug Pressures and Resistance Self-Efficacy?


Descriptive Note : Monograph


Corporate Author : RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA


Personal Author(s) : Hays, Ron D ; Ellickson, Phyllis L


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a257673.pdf


Report Date : Feb 1990


Pagination or Media Count : 23


Abstract : Based on three waves of data from 1,261 adolescents, this study examines the nature of resistance self-efficacy vis-a-vis different drugs and social situations, as well as its relationship to perceived pressure to use drugs. The authors found that both self-efficacy and perceived pressure to use drugs appear to be generalizable across substances (alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana), but adolescents tend to distinguish between their capacity to resist drugs in different social situations. Adolescents also discriminate between how much pressure they feel and their ability to resist that pressure, but the great majority report lower levels of self-efficacy in higher pressure situations. This relationship is strongest for alcohol and weakest for marijuana. These results suggest the following implications for prevention programs: (a) adolescents can be taught to resist one or more of the commonly used drugs with a reasonable expectation that the skills will generalize to other drugs; (b) resistance self-efficacy learned in one situation can be expected to have some generalizability to other situations, but it may be important to link resistance training with a range of situations to insure the greatest effectiveness, (c) to be maximally effective, prevention programs may need to help adolescents reduce the amount of pressure experienced as well as develop resistance skills -- such efforts are likely to be particularly important for situations involving alcohol.


Descriptors :   *RESISTANCE , *ADOLESCENTS , *PREVENTION , *CANNABIS , *ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION , *PRESSURE , *TOBACCO SMOKING , SKILLS , DRUG USERS , DRUGS , ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES , SURVEYS , TRAINING


Subject Categories : Sociology and Law
      Psychology
      Food, Food Service and Nutrition
      Toxicology


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE