Accession Number : ADA257264


Title :   Contingency Force Sizing


Corporate Author : INSTITUTE FOR DEFENSE ANALYSES ALEXANDRIA VA


Personal Author(s) : Barnett, Sean D


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a257264.pdf


Report Date : Sep 1992


Pagination or Media Count : 19


Abstract : The study objective was to assess the impact of the problems driving U.S. contingency force size, and to assess the value to the force of a reconnaissance/strike complex (RSC). The study identified four problems: inserting the force, defending against armored attack, defending against infiltration, and logistics. To assess their impact, it drew upon the histories of previous operations, military literature, professional judgment, and the IDA- developed VFM combat model. Force insertion is not trivial, but in the past the U.S. has inserted contingency forces without great opposition. Once ashore, U.S. forces could use an RSC of sophisticated targeting capabilities and precision strike munitions to defeat large armored opponents. However, future contingency operations might find U.S. forces in close terrain. facing infantry-based infiltration attacks. Today the U.S. would require a large ground force to defend a position in such a situation. That force would require and would have to defend a sizable logistical infrastructure to support itself away from a permanent base. The study found that force would be much larger than the RSC- supported force required to defeat an armored attack. Furthermore, it would be very difficult to lift and supply such a force by air.


Descriptors :   *MILITARY FORCES(UNITED STATES) , *MILITARY FORCE LEVELS , MILITARY OPERATIONS , ARMORED VEHICLES , AIR TRANSPORTATION , MILITARY TRAINING


Subject Categories : Military Forces and Organizations


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE