Accession Number : ADA235185


Title :   Naval Arms Control: The Backdrop of History


Corporate Author : RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA


Personal Author(s) : Lacy, James L


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a235185.pdf


Report Date : Aug 1990


Pagination or Media Count : 76


Abstract : The West's reluctance to place general purpose naval forces on the arms control table is based on many considerations-some of them strategic, but one of them historical. In a commonly held view, the United States and Britain fared badly in the naval agreements of the 1920s and 1930s. The Axis powers built up their navies in the 1930s, the democracies languished behind, and Germany and Japan were harder to defeat at sea during World War II precisely because of this unhappy record. It is not only memories of the interwar period's naval agreements that trouble many in the West today. The entire subject seems to leave a bad after taste. This note retraces the larger steps along a path nearly two hundred years long, with emphasis on the twentieth century. Although the subject is naval arms control, the discussion is also about navies, naval power, and the strategy and politics that have woven together aspirations to unfetter sea power on the one hand, and inclinations to constrain that power on the other.


Descriptors :   *ARMS CONTROL , GLOBAL , UNITED STATES , POLITICAL SCIENCE , NAVY , GERMANY(EAST AND WEST) , TABLES(DATA) , POWER , AGREEMENTS , WARFARE , JAPAN


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE