Accession Number : ADA063850


Title :   Piloted Aircraft Environment Simulation Techniques


Descriptive Note : Conference proceedings


Corporate Author : ADVISORY GROUP FOR AEROSPACE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT NEUILLY-SUR-SEINE (FRANCE)


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a063850.pdf


Report Date : Apr 1978


Pagination or Media Count : 307


Abstract : Over the last 20 years or so, piloted flight simulation has gradually emerged as a recognized and widely accepted tool for aeronautical research and development while, in parallel, it has become a valuable training aid. Today's status has been achieved in the face of the fundamental criticism that, with a human pilot in the control loop, we are necessarily involved in deception and illusions; we try to make the pilot behave and react as though he were flying a real aircraft; and we expect him to suspend disbelief while doing so. The objective is simulation of the real world - not duplication. The fundamental problem in the use of the piloted flight simulator is that the pilot is bound to be influenced by the qualities of the simulator itself. It is relatively easy to list the potential deficiencies in a representation of the real aircraft environment but virtually impossible to say what the effects of these deficiencies will be. Thus, while simulation equipment manufacturers strive to reduce these deficiencies, we cannot say with much certainty which are the critical features most in need of improvement. There is no question that simulation has been, and will continue to be, a quite invaluable tool. The piloted flight simulator is to the flight dynamicist what the wind tunnel is to the aerodynamicist. The emphasis on the control of development costs and operational training costs suggests that flight simulators will play an increasingly important role in the future. In the training field, we can expect continued and expanding acceptance of simulation as an alternative to flying training.


Descriptors :   *TRAINING DEVICES , *FLIGHT SIMULATION , PILOTS , AIRCRAFT SEATS , AERIAL WARFARE , ATMOSPHERE MODELS , AIRCRAFT , ENVIRONMENTS , HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING


Subject Categories : Aircraft
      Humanities and History
      Test Facilities, Equipment and Methods


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE