Accession Number : AD1041771


Title :   Development of Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) Tools to Promote Adjustment during Reintegration following Deployment


Descriptive Note : Technical Report,15 Oct 2012,14 Oct 2016


Corporate Author : Tel Aviv University Tel Aviv Israel


Personal Author(s) : Bar-Haim, Yair


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/1041771.pdf


Report Date : 01 Jun 2017


Pagination or Media Count : 60


Abstract : The overarching goal of the grant was to develop valid and reliable computerized tools to measure and modify anger-related cognitive biases and ultimately to examine their efficiency in reducing anger and adjustment difficulties among soldiers. The first aim of the research, addressed in the first reported study, was to measure the associations between anger measures and biases in anger-related attention and interpretation. This aim was addressed in the completion of a correlational study, and the publication of a scientific report describing its findings. The second aim was to explore the effect of cognitive interpretation training on anger related outcomes. This aim was addressed in a second study reported here, which found evidence for the efficacy of computerized interpretation training in reducing anger-related interpretations of ambiguous faces, mitigating self-reported state anger and reducing anger-related displaced retaliation behavior in an interpersonal game. No effect on self-reported trait anger was found. A scientific report describing these findings has been prepared and submitted for publication, and is currently under review. The third aim was to explore the effect of attention bias modification (ABM) training on anger related outcomes. This aim was addressed in the third study, which found no evidence for the efficacy of computerized attention training in reducing anger-related attention bias, or on self-reported anger measures and physiological reactivity related to an annoying manipulation. There was a training effect on anger-related displaced retaliation behavior in an interpersonal game, but since no training-related cognitive change was evidenced, it could not be concluded that this group difference is related to change in attention patterns. Conclusions and recommendations for future research following these findings are included in this summarizing report.


Descriptors :   human emotions , ANGER , MILITARY PERSONNEL , DEPLOYMENT , intervention , BIAS


Subject Categories : Psychology
      Personnel Management and Labor Relations


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE